Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Updates to Textmex, Mextasy, Eyegiene, London Rocks, SDSU Press y More!

A quick 2018 update on what I am up to--a reminder that though this blog is still active, more frequent updates appear here on the Textmex/Mextasy Facebook page!

Here's a direct link to the radio interview in the embedded post below.

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Sunday, November 26, 2017

Mami Chula's, RIP, The End of a Laredo Tradition | #repost + Update!

Textmex Galleryblog Video Edition from Mextasy on Vimeo.

Mami Chula's, a unique place to wet your whistle, and, to no one's surprise, not always a place of great repute...

and, a sad coda...

Postscript: It has been pointed out to me over the years how lame my efforts at 60 Minutes style journalism were back in 2010 (always leave the camera running)--and probably still now! So here, for starving eyes, a true insider video from Laredo's "Ice House of Infamy." 

Friday, November 17, 2017

Feliz Navidad from all the Crazy Team at the Tex{t}-Mex Galleryblog!


NOT pirated, re-purposed corporate photography! What gave you that idea!

Here at Tex[t]-Mex Galleryblog central, we know you suffer. 

You had grown accustomed to the tons of postings I used to do back in the day, whilst all around us, social media giants like twitter, facebook, and instagram made it easier and easier for me to post on other platforms! And you thought, maybe, like some Scrooge of Internet Present, I had deserted thee!

Fear not, amigos!!!! 

I will not be abandoning this 11-year old project/platform anytime soon--the joys of blogging are immense. 

So may the coming holiday season treat you and yours to too much food, lots of delicious vino y cerveza, and all the love (and the occasional fight or two) with your familia and loved ones. 

Lastly, may the old fat jolly man in the red suit gift you will all kinds of fine swag--(especially) the dirt cheap swag that appears in the kindly advertisement that appears below:

http://www.amazon.com/Tex-Mex-Seductive-Hallucinations-Mexican/dp/0292714572/sr=8-1/qid=1166986159?ie=UTF8&s=books&tag2=sandiegosta05-20 

Chihuahuas, though utterly high-strung, are easy to please!

Take Tex[t]-Mex's Christmas salesdog, perrito "Don Santa Chepe" here, on the right (ignore his doppelgänger twin, Mexy Don Chepe, canoodling with Jeff Bezos, on the left)! 


All you have to do to bring a smile to the little vato's face is to click him! What happens next is magical! You'll be instantly teleported to Amazon.com where you can buy William "Memo" Nericcio's desmadre-filled book on "Mexicans" in the United States and beyond: Tex[t]-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of the "Mexican" in America.


But wait! a better deal (and over 5 bucks cheaper!)--and yes, fellow cynics, I get more Christmas cash as well...

eyegiene.tictail.com 
If Jeff Bezos is already TOO TOO rich for your liking, and you KNOW he is, and Amazon is too too corporate for you, then go here to the mom and pop (ok, it's just me!) Eyegiene/Mextasy Poster Shoppe and snap up a much more reasonably priced, signed/autographed copy of Tex[t]-Mex (just email Bill Nericcio at memo@sdsu.edu and tell him who to make the book out to...).

When you buy the book via tictail.com you'll receive two gift posters of your own choosing and you will have made lil' Don Santa Chepe (and your rasquache profe friend) tremendously happy!

Friday, October 27, 2017

Mextasy @ Salisbury University, Pre-Show Tour #mextasy

October 26, 2017 | Mextasy @ Salisbury University | Pop-up Exhibition Walk-Thru from Mextasy on Vimeo.

A brief piece documenting the set-up for the Salisbury University Mextasy Pop-up Exhibition, Thursday, October 26, 2017, featuring art by JR, Izel Vargas, Chepo Peña, and other cool Latinx cats!

Just a quick posting of snapshots from the Salisbury University #mextasy gig last night--thanks to April Logan and all the amazing professors, students, staff, and more at the event!




 Here's a collection of promo posters and stuff from the event; click to enlarge!






From their university press release:

Press Releases

 
Monday, October 9, 2017

Nericcio Presents 'Mextasy' Exhibit, Lecture at SU October 26

Dr. William NericcioSALISBURY, MD---Salisbury University’s extended Hispanic Heritage Month Festival culminates with an evening of presentations by Dr. William “Memo” Nericcio, professor of English and comparative literature at San Diego State University and director of its Master of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences Program, on Thursday, October 26.
From 4-9 p.m., Nericcio presents the exhibit “Mextasy: Seductive Hallucinations of Latina/o Mannequins Prowling the American Unconscious.”
At 7 p.m., he explains the themes covered in the exhibit during the Dotterer Public Lectures on Literature talk “Cyborg Chicanos, Virtual Latinas, Smartphone Addiction and Digital Culturas: Viral, Electric Mutations of Latinx Stereotypes in the Age of the Internet.”
.: Related Sites :.
Both are in the Patricia R. Guerrieri Academic Commons Assembly Hall.
Nericcio is the author of the 2007 book Tex[t]-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of the “Mexican” in America. The publication explores representations of Latino and Latina identity in popular media, including film, television, advertising, comic books, toys, literature, video games and graffiti.
His SU presentations are sponsored by the Fulton Public Humanities Program; English Department; Social Justice, Equity and Transforming Teaching at SU Faculty Learning Community; Su Art Galleries; SU Zeta Pi chapter of the Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc; and Charles R. and Martha N. Fulton School of Liberal Arts Dean’s office.
Admission is free and the public is invited. For more information call 410-543-6450 or visit the SU website at www.salisbury.edu.


Sunday, September 03, 2017

REPOSTING FROM Duke's ARROB@ Site! Comic Strip Mextasy Illustrated: The Postmodern, Poststructuralism Semiotic Play of Gus Arriola's GORDO!

#reposted September 3, 2017


Gus Arriola’s effort here is the stuff of history—breaking the fourth wall he reveals himself as a Mid-Century devotee of the postmodern: a contemporary/compatriot with the likes of Thomas PynchonJoanna Russ, and Umberto Eco.

Long toward the end of a long timeline that begins with the Lascaux cave paintings, there, just after the turn of the last century between Winsor McCay and genius-of-the-present-moment Chris Ware, rests the redoubtable master of sequential art, Gus Arriola. A Mexican-American artist from Arizona who ended up spending the rest of his life in California, Arriola’s comic strip Gordo delighted bemused and confused readers from November 24, 1941 to March 2, 1985. “Confused” because Arriola’s ambition, particularly in his Sunday splash-page cartoons, were the stuff of comic book legend, marrying the semiotic ambition and range of McCay’s earlier work, with a baroque, jazzy color palette (and a sublime disregard for the precision of the square panel—a precision, I might add, that has led to the banal cacophony of boring, shrunk, stiff compositions that fill the daily fishwrap today: yes, Mary Worth and Beetle Bailey, I am talking about you).

Of course, this is the Sunday funnies/fonnies, so the gag is still there. But there, too, is a cunning collaboration pairing jazz improvisation with semiotic artistry.
Gordo is best remembered for being one of the few daily, mainstream, narrative artifacts that was focused on Mexico, Mexicans, and Mexican culture—also one of the few that was positive and evocative (though, irony of ironies, Gordo begins as a strip focused on a fat, lazy, “Mexican”--scare-quotes necessary, por favor). In an American popular culture sea of stereotypes featuring raping bandit Mexicans (in case you’re wondering where idiot Donald Trump gets his ideas), dirty, pre-civilization Latinas/os, and the rest, Gordo evolves as a brimming visual cauldron of subterranean semiotic insurrection, surreptitiously introducing readers to Mexicans and Spanish-language culture with a light touch, and a rigorous and disruptive compositional eye.  Old school hands in the comics trade like Mort Walker and Charles Schulz envied Arriola’s eye and pen, with Charlie Brown’s father touting Arriola’s strip as the “the most beautifully drawn strip in the history of the business.” Like the aforementioned Chris Ware, Arriola’s genius rested with what used to be called postmodern aesthetics—as much as Arriola loved to tell a story he also (and simultaneously) told a story about stories (meta-narrative from a Chicano meta-mensch).

Yet another Sunday effort focused on making music, this time classical pieces, visual.
All the sister arts made cameos in Arriola’s canvases, not just music. Here the ridiculous outrages of Abstract Expressionism falls across Gus’s panels (Kurt Vonnegut’s Rabo Karabekian artist character follows a similar vein).
For me, a little Mexican-American kid growing up in the 60s, Arriola’s warped and warping lines did a number on my imagination—though I was born on and in the U.S./Mexico border in Laredo, Texas, and was, as a result, submerged in Tex-Mex/Mexicano cultura, the English-language/ ‘Merican side of my psyche was utterly bereft of Mexican influences—in this regard both Speedy Gonzales and Gordo are like bizarre twin angel and devil perched upon my shoulder, speaking in English (but with a decidedly “Mexican” accent) and seducing my psyche with parsed and unparsable utterances that moved and delighted me on the surface and had deeper, unknowable impacts elsewhere, marking my career in cultural studies.

The Director’s Cut: Dear Arrob@ reader, do note that this piece of writing has had a long sordid history: a somewhat truncated version of this piece first appeared in Joshua Glenn’s cool online magazine Hi-Lobrow.com. Next, it appeared in The Routledge Companion to Latina/o Popular Culture edited by my good friend and collaborator Frederick Luis AldamaIn its first incarnation, Josh Glenn put his able editorial pruning shears to work and edited it down to a squib (I still love you, Josh!); next, the production team at Palgrave/Routledge got the bright idea to cut out ALL of the images—writing about Gus Arriola without sharing his vivid, artful comic provocations is madness. So here, on Arrob@, you get the director’s cut. I pray the shade of Gus Arriola visits me in the night and gifts me with a shred of his lucid, evocative imagination!

Sunday, August 20, 2017

#Mextasy Coming to Salisbury University October 26, 2017 | More Info to Follow...



Look out Salisbury University​, something "Mexican" your way cometh on October 26, 2017! #mextasy #textmex #circusofdesmadres

The details:

As part of SU’s celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, William "Memo" Nericcio, Professor of English & Comparative Literature at San Diego State University and director of their pathbreaking MALAS Program (the Master of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences), will deliver a lecture entitled “Cyborg Chicanos, Virtual Latinas, Smartphone Addiction, and Digital Culturas: Viral, Electric Mutations of Latinx Stereotypes in the Age of the Internet. ”

His talk is inspired by his American Library Association award-winning book Tex[t]-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of the “Mexican” in America (2007) that explores representations of Latina/o identity in the popular media--in film, television, advertising, comic books, toys, literature, video games, graffiti, etc.

Before the talk, the public is invited to view his pop-up art exhibit Mextasy: Seductive Hallucinations of Latina/o Mannequins Prowling the American Unconscious, which further explores some of same themes as his talk, on display in the Wicomico Room from 4:00 PM until the end of the lecture. The talk and exhibit are sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs, the SU Department of English, SU Galleries, and the Fulton Public Humanities Program. Among his other roles at SDSU, Nericcio works as lead faculty the NEH-supported Digital Humanities Initiative and also directs SDSU Press. Previously, he was an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Connecticut from 1988 to 1991. He holds an MA and PhD in Comparative Literature from Cornell University where he worked as Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes's Graduate Research Assistant, hung out at parties with Edward Said, Jurgen Habermas, Gayatri Spivak, and Jacques Derrida (and worked with them in seminar as well). A Mexican-Sicilian-American and an innovative troublemaker, Nericcio was born in Laredo, Texas, along the Rio Grande River in South Texas.

    Event: Lecture and Exhibit
    Date: Thursday, October 26
    Time - Lecture: 7:00-9:00 PM
    Time – Exhibit: 4:00-9:00 PM

    *Location: Academic Commons, Assembly Hall*